Wellington Travel Guide

Understand

Wellington is only New Zealand's third largest city, a long way behind Auckland and even Christchurch. It's actually just one of the four cities making up the Wellington metropolitan area which is New Zealand's second largest urban area - the other three towns being Lower Hutt, Upper Hutt and Porirua.

Wellington offers a blend of culture, heritage, fine food and coffee, together with lively arts and entertainment.

Surrounded by hills and a rugged coastline, the city has a stunning harbour. Wellington’s charm is that it serves up a vibrant inner city experience with a slice of New Zealand scenery. And because of its compact nature, you can sample it all: boutiques, art galleries, trendy cafés and restaurants. Right on its doorstep is a network of walking and biking trails with beautiful wineries and vineyards just a few hours away.

Wellington offers an array of theatre, music, dance, fine arts and galleries and museums. It is also home to one of the nation’s key attractions, the Museum of New Zealand Te Papa Tongarewa.

The city promotes itself as "Absolutely Positively Wellington". Its motto Suprema a situ claims site supremacy, with some justification. Wellington was named as the fourth best city in the world to visit in 2011 by "Lonely Planet Best in Travel 2011".

Wellington Visitor Information CentreCivic Square, Corner Victoria and Wakefield StPhone: +64 4 802-4860Tollfree: 0800 933 5363A good place to begin your Wellington visit - they're able to book accommodation, activities and provide useful information about Wellington and surrounding areas. Their website contains the same information and is worth checking out prior to your visit. They are a member of the national i-SITE visitor information centre network.
Politics

Because it is the capital city, the New Zealand Parliament and the head offices of many Government departments and large businesses occupy central Wellington. This is especially true in the areas closest to Parliament Buildings - the northern end of The Terrace and Lambton Quay areas and the Thorndon commercial area.

Geology

Much of the central city is built on land that was raised up after a major earthquake in 1855. More land has been reclaimed since then. The shoreline as it was in 1840 is marked by plaques in the footpaths on Lambton Quay (hence the street name). There are several "quays" which are now nowhere near the harbour. The harbour's former name was 'Port Nicholson' and the smaller bay surrounded by the city is called 'Wellington' or 'Lambton Harbour'.

Earthquakes have played a major part in forming the whole Wellington region, the exposed face of the Wellington fault being prominent as the line of hills adjacent to the harbour between Thorndon and Petone. There are several major earthquake faults in the region, some of which slip one metre or more in one jump every few centuries. Building regulations have meant that many older city buildings have been either demolished or strengthened, or require such work to be undertaken. Small and moderate earthquakes occasionally rock Wellington; so if the earth seems to move for you, it may not be just your imagination: stay indoors unless a "warden" or similar authority advises evacuation, and take shelter from potentially falling objects wherever you are.

There are some places in Wellington where damage from the 1855 earthquake is still visible. The most accessible is a large landslip on State Highway 2 between Ngauranga and Korokoro (just north of Rocky Point where the BP petrol station is located) where the dramatic change in terrain is visible. Bush has overgrown the slip but is visible. However, most people are oblivious to the location of landslip as they drive by on the highway.

Climate

Wellington is known as the Windy City. The prevailing wind is from the northwest but the strongest winds are southerly. The wind speed and direction can be seen by the flag being flown from the Beehive. A large flag is flown only on calm days, a small flag is flown when windy days are expected. If flying into Wellington, expect a bumpy approach.

The temperature in Wellington rarely drops below 0°C (32°F), even on a cold winter's night, while daytime winter temperatures are rarely lower than 8°C (46°F). During summer, the daytime maximum temperature rarely gets above 25°C (77°F). Away from the seaside, in inland valleys, frosts of up to -10°C (14°F) have been recorded and snow settles on the nearby ranges in winter.

Geography

Wellington sits at the southern tip of New Zealand's North Island. The city core lies along the western shore of highly-protected Wellington Harbour, with the city's suburbs spreading out in all directions. The city's primary urban core consists of the CBD and the adjoining 'city suburb' of Te Aro, to the south and east. A fairly dense zone continues south from Te Aro into the adjoining suburbs of Mt Cook and Newtown, as well as Kilbirnie on the other side of the parklands of Mt Victoria.

East from Te Aro, north-south-running ridgelines form Mt. Victoria and, further east yet, the Miramar Peninsula, which forms the western side of the mouth to Wellington Harbour. These hills—and the isthmus between—are home to a number of suburban areas as well as parkland and beaches.

Several kilometres south of central Wellington is the rugged and stunning South Coast of the North Island, consisting of a string of small (and some large) bays, many with rocky beaches and interesting tide pools.

To the west, the suburbs between Karori and Johnsonville spread into the hillsides, with various parks and hiking trails, and then give way to open rural areas such as Makara.

Holidays

Aside from the national public holidays, Wellington has its own public holiday, Wellington Anniversary Day. Commemorating the arrival of Wellington's first European settlers aboard the Aurora on 22 January 1840, it is observed across most of the Greater Wellington and Manawatu-Wanganui region on the Monday closest to 22 January.

source: Wikivoyage

Things To Do in Wellington See All Things To Do in Wellington

  • Mount Victoria

    Mount Victoria

    Alexandra Lookout Rd

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  • Museum City & Sea

    Museum City & Sea

    153 Featherston Street

    The Museum of Wellington City & Sea is a museum on Queens Wharf in Wellington, New Zealand. It occup...

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  • Old St. Paul's, Wellington

    Old St. Paul's, Wellington

    34 Mulgrave Street, Thorndon

    You may be looking for Old St. Paul's Cathedral, a destroyed cathedral in the City of London. Or ...

    Attractions, Activities,Arts and Culture, Sports, Historical Sites, Entertainment, Landmarks and Points Of Interest
  • Kura Gallery Wellington

    Kura Gallery Wellington

    19 Allen Street, Te Aro

    Kura showcases artworks unique to Aotearoa/New Zealand and exhibits an extensive range of original, ...

    Attractions,Arts and Culture

Hotels in Wellington (85 Hotels) See All Wellington Hotels

  • Ohtel

    Spotted in Wellington, Ohtel is a premium hotel comfortably located in close proximity to Social Cooking, Wellington Ocean Sports and Downstage Theatre. Many other leadin...

  • Novotel Wellington

    Novotel Wellington is one of the top, premium places to stay in Wellington. Nicely found in close proximity to Kirkcaldie & Stains, New Zealand Portrait Gallery and Museu...

  • Bolton Hotel

    Bolton Hotel is among the top, premium places to remain in Wellington. Perfectly found in close proximity to Reserve Bank Museum, St Andrew's on the Terrace and The Crick...

  • InterContinental Wellington

    InterContinental Wellington is one of the top, finest places to remain in Wellington. Nicely located near Museum of Wellington City & Sea, Plimmer Steps and Alexander Mck...

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