Orlando Travel Guide

Public Transport

Airports
The Orlando International Airport (MCO) is Orlando's primary airport and currently the second busiest airport in the state of Florida closely behind Miami International Airport. The airport serves as a secondary hub and corporate headquarters for AirTran Airways and a focus hub city for Southwest Airlines, JetBlue Airways and Frontier Airlines. The airport serves as a major international gateway for the mid-Florida region with major foreign carriers including Lufthansa, Air Canada, British Airways, Air France, WestJet, Virgin Atlantic, Aer Lingus, TAM, and Aeromexico.
The Orlando Sanford International Airport (SFB) in nearby suburb of Sanford, Florida serves as a secondary airport for the region and is a focus city airport for Allegiant Air.
The Orlando Executive Airport (ORL) near Downtown Orlando serves primarily executive jets, flight training schools, and general small-aircraft aviation.
Roads

Major highways
Interstate 4 is Orlando's primary interstate highway. Orlando is the second-largest city served by one interstate, preceding Austin, Texas and is the largest metropolitan area in the US serviced by a single interstate. The interstate begins in Tampa, Florida and travels northeast across the midsection of the state directly through Orlando, ending in Daytona Beach. As a key connector to Orlando's suburbs, downtown, area attractions, and both coasts, I-4 commonly experiences heavy traffic and congestion. I-4 is also known as State Road 400.
East-West Expressway (Toll 408) is a major east–west highway managed by the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority. The highway intersects with I-4 in Downtown Orlando, providing a key artery for residents commuting from eastern and western suburbs including the University of Central Florida and Waterford Lakes area. The highway also intersects with the Central Florida Greeneway (Toll 417) and Florida's Turnpike. By late 2006, the I-4/408 interchange had almost completed undergoing a major overhaul that creates multiple fly-over bridges and connectors to ease heavy traffic. The agency recently finished construction of lane expansions, new toll plazas, and sound barriers along the roadway, though much work remains to be done.
Beachline Expressway (Toll 528) provides key access to the Orlando International Airport and serves as a gateway to the Atlantic coast, specifically Cocoa Beach and Cape Canaveral.
Central Florida Greenway (Toll 417) is a key highway for East Orlando, the highway is also managed by the Orlando-Orange County Expressway Authority and serves as Orlando's eastern beltway. The highway intersects with the East-West Expressway (Toll 408), the Beachline Expressway (Toll 528), and begins and ends on Interstate 4.
Daniel Webster Western Beltway (Toll 429) serves as Orlando's western beltway. The highway serves as a "back entrance" to Walt Disney World from Orlando's northwestern suburbs including Apopka via Florida's Turnpike.
John Land Apopka Expressway (Toll 414) A new east to west tollway serving northern Orlando. Phase I opened on February 14, 2009 and extends from US 441 to State Road 429. Phase II will link SR 429 to US 441 several miles west of the current SR 429 intersection.
Florida's Turnpike (Toll 91) is a major highway that connects northern Florida with Orlando and terminates in Miami.
Rush hours and traffic

Orlando, like other major cities, experiences gridlock and traffic jams daily, especially when commuting from the northern suburbs in Seminole County south to downtown and from the eastern suburbs of Orange County to Downtown. Heavy traffic is also common in the tourist district south of downtown. Rush hours (peak traffic hours) are usually weekday mornings (after 7 am) and afternoons (after 4 pm). There are various traffic advisory resources available for commuters including downloading the Tele-Traffic App (available for iPhone and Android), dialing 5-1-1 (a free automated traffic advisory system provided by the Florida Department of Transportation, available by dialing 511), visiting the Florida 511 Web site, listening to traffic reports on major radio stations, and reading electronic traffic advisory displays (also called Variable-message signs, information is also provided by FDOT) on the major highways and roadways.

Rail

The Orlando area is served by one through railroad, CSX Transportation's A line (formerly the Atlantic Coast Line Railroad's main line), and some spurs, mostly operated by the Florida Central Railroad. Amtrak passenger service runs along the CSX A line. See also a map of these railroads.

Amtrak intercity passenger rail service operates from the Orlando Amtrak Station south of downtown. The Mission Revival-style station has been in continuous use since 1927, first for the Atlantic Coast Line, then the Seaboard Coast Line Railroad (signage for which is still displayed over the station's main entrance). Amtrak's Silver Meteor and Silver Star service Orlando four times daily, twice bound for points north to New York City and twice bound for points south to Miami. Orlando also serves as a transfer hub for Amtrak Thruway Motorcoach bus service. Orlando Station has the highest Amtrak ridership in the state, with the exception of the Auto Train depot located in nearby Sanford.

Historically, Orlando's other major railroad stations have included:

Atlantic Coast Line Railroad Orlando station (now Church Street Station, a commercial development)
Seaboard Air Line Railroad Orlando station (Central Avenue Station; 1898–1955.)
Commuter rail

In 2005, federal and state funding was granted for the establishment of SunRail, a local commuter rail service, to operate on the CSX A line tracks between DeLand and Poinciana, passing through the downtown area and surrounding urban neighborhoods along the way. The service was expected to substantially reduce traffic congestion along the I-4 corridor, especially between Downtown Orlando and the suburban communities in Seminole and Volusia Counties. The federal and state funds would have covered approximately 80% of the estimated $400 million cost for track modifications and construction of stations along the route. The counties involved had approved local matching funds in 2007 and the line was projected to begin operations in 2011. However, the project was ultimately voted down by Florida State Senate in 2008 and again in 2009 due to an amendment that would have approved a $200 million insurance policy for the system. Although there had been growing concern the system would be scrapped, a deadline extension combined with a new insurance arrangement with CSX brought new hope that SunRail will be completed after all.

In a special session in December 2009, the Florida Legislature approved commuter rail for Florida, which also enabled high-speed rail federal funding. SunRail is now underway and is slated to open for passenger service beginning in May 2014. Phase I of the rail system will run from Debary to Sand Lake Road in South Orlando. Phase II, which isn't expected to be completed until 2016, will connect from DeBary and continue north to DeLand. Also as part of phase II the track will extend from Sand Lake Road in Orlando south to Poinciana.

SunRail is expected to make a significant impact Central Florida's economy.

Attempts to establish a smaller light rail service for the Orlando area were also considered at one time, but were also met with much resistance.

High speed rail

On January 28, 2010, President Obama said that Florida would be receiving $1.25 billion to start the construction of a statewide high speed rail system with Orlando as its central hub. The first stage would have connected Orlando and Tampa, Florida and was expected to be completed by 2014. The second stage was to connect Orlando and Miami, Florida. The project was canceled by Gov. Rick Scott in 2011, and on March 4, 2011, the Florida Supreme Court unanimously turned down the request of two state senators to force Scott to accept federal funding for the project.

Bus

Regional

Orlando is served by LYNX, which provides local transit service covering a five-county area: Orange, Seminole, Osceola, Polk, and Volusia.

National

Greyhound Lines offers intercity bus service from Orlando to multiple locations across the country. The Orlando Greyhound Station is located west of Downtown Orlando.

Taxi

Orlando is served by a collection of independently owned taxi companies, including Mears Transportation, Star Taxi, and United Taxi among others. While traveling in downtown Orlando, taxis can be hailed on a regular basis. Taxis are also available in and around the Amway Center, Orlando Convention Center, and all major attractions/theme parks (i.e., Universal Studios, Disney World, etc.).

Airport shuttles

Transportation between the Orlando International Airport and various locations in and around Orlando are provided by airport shuttle services including Orlando Airport Van, Mears Transportation, and Super Shuttle. Several shuttles operate 24 hours a day, 7 days a week

source: Wikipedia

Things To Do in Orlando See All Things To Do in Orlando

  • American Ghost Adventures

    American Ghost Adventures

    Downtown Orlando Meet at 129 W...

    Interactive ghost tours and investigations In the shadows of the castles lies American Ghost Adventu...

    Attractions, Activities,Landmarks and Points Of Interest, Tours
  • Universal's Islands Of Adventure

    Universal's Islands Of Adventure

    6000 Universal Blvd.

    Attractions,Landmarks and Points Of Interest
  • Mama's Comedy Show

    Mama's Comedy Show

    8267 International Dr

    Sit down with the "family" and experience the hottest improv comedy in Orlando. Mama's Comedy Show i...

    Activities, Attractions,Entertainment, Landmarks and Points Of Interest
  • Thornton Park District

    Thornton Park District

    E Washington Street, N Summerl...

    Located in Downtown Orlando, the Thornton Park District is the city’s most stylish district for shop...

    Lifestyle, Local Stores and Services, Attractions,Shopping, Food and Drink, Stores, Landmarks and Points Of Interest

Hotels in Orlando (255 Hotels) See All Orlando Hotels

Top Destinations in United States