Miami Travel Guide

Getting Around

By public transit

Miami's public transit system is the most diverse and extensive of any locality in Florida. In short, if travel time is not a priority, it is possible to travel to all commercial areas and major attractions within Miami without a car.

Miami's bus system covers the entire county and connects to bus lines serving Broward County and the Greater Fort Lauderdale area. Recent developments have made the bus system more reliable than in the past. Even with the changes, and because of high local traffic, buses tend to have a hard time remaining on schedule. However, buses run often enough through each route so as not to be a nuisance. Many of the major bus routes operate 24 hours a day, seven days week, including the Route S bus, which connects downtown Miami to all of Miami Beach, terminating at Avenutra Mall in north Miami-Dade.

The Metrorail is a single-line elevated rail system serving Miami and surrounding cities, running 22.4 mi with 22 stations. It connects many areas of tourist interest, including downtown Miami, Dadeland Mall, Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, Lowe Art Museum, Miami Museum of Science, Village at Merrick Park and many other nearby shopping areas. Coconut Grove and downtown Coral Gables can be reached via short shuttle bus from various stations. Metrorail operates between roughly 5AM and midnight, with a bus serving all Metrorail stations operating in the overnight hours, effectively providing 24-hour service.

Recently, state and federal funding has allowed for planned expansions to the Metrorail to take better shape. A connection to Miami International Airport started construction in late 2009, and is expected to be fully operational by Spring 2012. Along with this project, a northern expansion dubbed the 'Orange Line' was given more than $4.3 billion in funding in the 2009 Federal "Stimulus Package" and is expected to be opened as early as 2014. This new line will connect the Metrorail line with Dolphins Stadium, Miami-Dade College, and the suburbs of Miami Gardens and Opa-locka. There have also been discussions among elected leaders for a light rail line to Miami Beach, as well as a Miami Streetcar connecting Downtown Miami to the Media and Entertainment District in Midtown Miami, though no formal plans have been proposed or approved for funding.

Fare for a single trip on both Metrorail and Metrobus is $2 per ride ($1 for persons with disabilities or on Medicare). Day, weekly, and monthly pass are available. In early 2010, Miami-Dade Transit implemented a fare card system known as EASY Card. Though exact change/cash is still accepted on all Metrobus routes, an EASY Card is required for riding the Metrorail, and for utilizing the free transfers offered between an unlimited number of bus routes, and a single Metrorail ride. Currently, the fare card software does not allow passbacks. Any remaining transit tokens you may have can no longer be exchanged for EASY Card credit, and are not accepted as fare. Additional information on fares, routes and schedules can be found at, or by calling +1 305 770-3131.

Downtown Miami is served by a free elevated people mover system known as Metromover, which connects to Metrorail at two stations at Government Center in the central business district and at Brickell Station in Brickell. Metromover is free of charge and is the most efficient way to move around Downtown Miami. It is a great way to take a rest when walking around downtown, and a great time to take pictures of the skyscrapers and growing Miami skyline from above.

South Florida’s Regional Transportation Authority (SFRTA), or by calling +1 800 tri-rail. There are frequent tri rails (at least one per an hour) to one of the four major destinations, Broward County, Miami-Dade County, Palm Beach County and South Florida Education Center (SFEC)/ Davie Campus Transit Routes. Each of these four destinations have many different stops. Be sure to check the website for each stop and a schedule. There are employer discount programs on the website as well as fares.

By taxi

Taxis are generally expensive with a surcharge of $2.50 for the pick-up and an additional $0.40 for each sixth of a mile traveled. Almost all cab companies in the area have pre-determined rates for travel into the barrier islands of Miami Beach and other beach and nightclub communities popular with tourists which can range from $30–$60 depending on arrival location. For example, South Beach may be the most expensive while a residential neighborhood in Miami Beach may be the cheapest. The charge is the same regardless of pick-up location on the mainland. All taxis are fitted with maps of the barrier islands which state the cost per location. The same applies for passengers leaving the islands onto the mainland, though normal rates apply for person traveling by taxi within the islands or within the mainland.

Service is available throughout Miami-Dade, Broward, Palm Beach, and Monroe counties regardless of pick-up location. The normal service charges apply for these four counties, but it is wise to ask for a pre-determined price beforehand if leaving the county as this will in most cases turn out to be cheaper and most drivers are willing to negotiate when leaving the county. If you wish to be taxied to a location outside of those four counties, you must negotiate a price and advise the cab company first. Drivers may refuse to drive outside of the metropolitan area if they are not advised to do so beforehand.

Usually you will have to call a cab company and request a pick-up. Taxis operated by the major companies are not normally allowed to pick up passengers at random locations for safety and legal reasons except at MIA, the Port of Miami and train stations. Some individual taxi drivers will not follow this rule, however. You can try hailing a taxi in the street. A significant and notable exception to this rule is the South Beach section of Miami Beach. For all intents and purposes, taxis can be flagged from the street on the island in a very similar way to what one might expect in New York City. This trend has begun spreading into the downtown area of Miami, but is primarily due to the increased redevelopment and foot traffic downtown, and should not be relied upon if you have a schedule to keep.

All taxi drivers must have a valid license to operate. It is uncommon to hear of crimes involving unlicensed taxis anywhere in the metropolitan area since Dade County keeps track of all taxi activity in and around Miami and cooperates with other counties in getting this information. If you enter a cab and do not see a valid license placed in front of the passenger's seat, you should not enter the taxi and instead call another cab company regardless of what the driver says. If you willingly enter a taxi without a license or with an expired license and there is an incident or accident, it is possible that you may not be able to hold the driver accountable by law. When entering a cab you should make note of the driver's name, license number and cab number if any problems arise during the trip. This information should be easily found inside the taxi.It may be able to help you identify the cab driver to the police or the cab company.

By car

Unless you plan to stay downtown or in a single location elsewhere, you will find that a car is very convenient in Miami, and car rentals are cheap in comparison to other major US cities.

You can find cheap car rentals off terminal from the Miami Airport from such companies as E-Z Rent-A-Car and Ace Rent A Car. The major car rental companies can be found in terminal be can be often more expensive for the same service and vehicles.

Surface roads in Miami are usually easy to navigate. The area's roads are designed around a grid system, where most roads are numbered based on their distance from the city center. The two main axis roads are Miami Avenue (running north to south) and Flagler Street (running east to west). These two roads intersect in downtown Miami, the county's symbolic center. All avenues run north to south, while all streets run east to west. For example, the address, "9500 NW 30th Street" would be at the intersection of NW 30th Street (to the west of Miami Avenue, and 30 blocks north of Flagler Street) and NW 95th Avenue (north of Flagler Street, and 95 blocks west of Miami Avenue). Most roads in Miami conform to this nomenclature, but due to the more than 30 municipalities within Miami-Dade County, there are a few exceptions to be aware of. Examples include Coral Gables, the Coconut Grove section of Miami (city proper), Miami Lakes, and Hialeah. Hialeah is particularly notorious since it uses its own grid system, in addition to the overall county system. For example, NW 103rd Street is also marked as E 49th Street, or W 49th Street in Hialeah.

Note that if you cross into Broward County, the roads will be numbered based on their distance from the Fort Lauderdale city center, which is generally the same going east-west but will be very different going north-south. Most of the municipalities in Broward County use their own limited grid systems as well. Some street names also change at the county line. The coastline highway, A1A, is known as "Collins Avenue" in Miami, but becomes "Ocean Drive" in Broward. Likewise, "Red Road" in Miami becomes "Flamingo Road" in Broward.

Miami has four primary expressways. In addition to I-95 and Florida’s Turnpike, there is state highway 836 (also known as the Dolphin Expressway) and state highway 826 (also known as the Palmetto Expressway). The Dolphin Expressway runs west from downtown Miami along the edge of Miami International Airport. The Palmetto Expressway and Florida's Turnpike form "F"-shaped loops around the city. The Turnpike continues north, roughly parallel to I-95, and will take you to Orlando if you keep driving. I-95, the Palmetto and the Turnpike intersect at a junction in North Miami called the Golden Glades. You may find driving in the Glades challenging, especially if you have little experience driving in it.

New visitors to Miami should be aware that the area's drivers are particularly aggressive. AutoVantage.com's Road Rage Survey has rated Miami drivers the rudest in the country for a third year in a row . This shouldn't discourage anyone from using the roadways, but a passive approach to Miami driving can save you from an unwanted exchange with another driver, or even worse an accident. Posted speed limits are ignored by most drivers, especially on larger roads with lower speed limits. Two examples are I-95 and state road 826 (The Palmetto Expressway). The eastern portion of state road 836 (The Dolphin Expressway) between Miami International Airport and downtown Miami handles traffic that exceeds its capacity, and contains several left-hand exits, including the eastbound off-ramp to Lejuene Road (NW 42nd Avenue), which is the posted route, and the quickest route to Miami International Airport.

By Shuttle

Super Shuttle. +1 305 871-8210 or email sales@miamisupershuttle.com. There is a shuttle that will take you where ever you need to go from MIA airport and is called Super Shuttle Miami. Approach any of the blue vans located on the outer island. They also have guest services representatives in the airport wearing a blue Super Shuttle shirt.

source: Wikivoyage

Things To Do in Miami See All Things To Do in Miami

  • Zoo

    Zoo

    1 Zoo Blvd

    The Miami-Dade Zoological Park and Gardens, branded and commonly known as Zoo Miami, formerly known ...

    Attractions, Activities,Landmarks and Points Of Interest, Entertainment
  • Villa Vizcaya

    Villa Vizcaya

    3251 S Miami Ave

    Vizcaya, now named the Vizcaya Museum and Gardens, is the former villa and estate of businessman Jam...

    Attractions, Activities,Arts and Culture, Historical Sites, Outdoors
  • Fortom Gallery

    Fortom Gallery

    250 NW 23rd St. #201

    Attractions,Arts and Culture
  • Bayside Marketplace

    Bayside Marketplace

    401 Biscayne Blvd

    Bayside Marketplace is a festival marketplace in Downtown Miami, Florida. It is located between the ...

    Lifestyle, Attractions,Shopping, Landmarks and Points Of Interest

Hotels in Miami (124 Hotels) See All Miami Hotels

  • EPIC, a Kimpton Hotel

    Found within Miami, EPIC, a Kimpton Hotel is a premium hotel comfortably positioned close to Enliven Spa & Salon, Exhale Spa and Miami Convention Center. Other visited at...

  • Hampton Inn & Suites by Hilton Miami Brickell Downtown

    Located within Miami, Hampton Inn & Suites by Hilton Miami Brickell Downtown is conveniently placed close to El Vato Tequila and Taco Bar, Spazio Nightclub and Blue Marti...

  • Hotel Beaux Arts Miami

    Hotel Beaux Arts Miami is one of the top, finest places to stay in Miami. Beautifully located around Exhale Spa, Enliven Spa & Salon and Miami Convention Center, Hotel Be...

  • JW Marriott Marquis Miami

    Seen within Miami, JW Marriott Marquis Miami is a premium hotel opportunely located alongside Exhale Spa, Enliven Spa & Salon and Miami Convention Center. Additional well...

Top Destinations in United States