Marrakech Travel Guide

Food

16 cafeMoroccan kitchen. 16 coffee is caterer of events and weddings.
Cafe AlhamraPhone: +212 6504 7411Pl. Djemaa El-Fna, opposite Caf de France. On the edge of the square, it serves up salads, pizza, and pasta as well as a tagine of the day. Their rooftop is a good place to have a late night coffee and pastry while watching the events in the square below.
Cafe Arabe184 mouassinePhone: +212 2442 9728They have a Moroccan and an Italian cook, so there are two menus to choose from. There are three floors including the downstairs courtyard which is lovely for lunch. The top floor terrace has fantastic views, you can lounge on their sofas sipping a cocktail and watching the sun go down over the medina.
Cafe Mabrouk (off Djemaa El-Fna) serves the same standard fare as everywhere else in a little courtyard or terrace.
Chez Chegrouni, near the main entrance to the market. Their vegetarian couscous (Dh 30) is supposedly the only true vegetarian couscous in town; it's also bland but they give you plenty of it. Prices go up if you sit on the terrace. Usually packed full of good-time tourists.
Chez El Bahia is 50m away from Djemaa El-Fna on Rue Riad Zitoune (the street that starts at Wafa Restaurant). It's a quiet place. Try the chicken and olives tajine as well as the prune, almonds, and mutton tajine for about Dh 45 each. Also try the Moroccan salad while they cook the rest of the food.
Chez Yassine is 5 mn north from the Koutoubia mosque, 70 Rue Fatima Zohra Rmila (next to the Bacha hamam). Not much choice but served by very friendly people. Tajines (Dh 28) and pizzas (Dh 20-35) are great and you can also order skewers that are not on the menu.
Delhi Place Indian restaurantHotel Royal mirage, Avenue De La Menara Mohamad 6Hours: lunch and dinnerPrice: 15 to 20Indian cuisine and is decorated in the Indian style.
Earth Cafe in the Medina is vegetarian-friendly. Number 2, Derb Zawak, Riad Zitoun Kedim, ☎+212 6054 4992, +212 6128 9402. Also available are vegan alternatives and plenty of options for fruit and vegetable-based drinks.
Henna Cafebab DoukalaPhone: 212 656566374Hours: 10-lateIf you want to travel ethically then this is your place! A pretty little cafe on 3 floors with an orange sign on the berber hand carved wooden facade opened in November 2011. You can have a cup of tea/coffee (80p) or simple lunch with dessert or just a sandwich (approximately 2). The Henna Cafe offers safe henna body adornment as well- ranging from a 50 dhm small motif on your hand to a full arm complex design for a wedding from 500 dhms. All profits go to local causes. Henna cafe was set up by the owners of Riad Cinnamon and Riad Papillon and Vivid Trading in order to start to 'give back' to Marrakech and offer support to those who might want it. Currently the cafe offers free English lessons to Moroccan women so that they can find employment out of the home.
Maison de la Photographie46, Rue souk Ahal FsA little photography museum, it has one of the highest roof terraces in the Medina. Over lunch of a fixed price menu (at 75DH as of 2012) you get panoramic views over the city and the High Atlas mountains.
Le Marrakchi is opposite the market and adjacent to the newspaper stand. With two main courses and wine running at around Dh 300, this is one of the poshest restaurants in the square. The food is not necessarily better than elsewhere, but it is one of the few restaurants that serves alcohol. It also has a completely enclosed upstairs terrace, which is ideal for views of the square when the weather is bad.

For more upscale eateries (and especially for non-Moroccan cuisine) you generally must go outside the Medina to Ville Nouvelle. However, Diaffa (Rue Jbel El Akhdar just off Av. Mohammed V, across from Club Med), is an upscale restaurant in one of the oldest buildings in the Medina, and offers Moroccan cuisine in an ambiance that recalls the Orient at the height of its magic and glory. The food, building (whether the tables around the central courtyard and fountain or the second-level balcony), and tactful and tasteful entertainment.

Dar Najat's KitchenDouar Groua, derb lalla chacha, N.18Phone: 00212524375085Hours: 20/23Price: 23 euro/paxDaily fresh food in a Boutique Riad.

Vegetarians will find that there are few options outside the ubiquitous Tagine avec Legumes (vegetable stew), Couscous avec Legumes, cheese omelette, pizza and salad.

How to eat (well) in the Djemaa El-Fna

Each night in the Djemaa El-Fna rows of street stalls are set up under giant white tents. The huts targeting tourists serve similar fare and have menus printed in French, Arabic and usually English. Everyone has tajine, couscous, brochette and some variety of soups. Some have specialities like offal, egg sandwiches or special tajines. Be aware that most restaurants employ rather insistent "greeters," who are very aggressive in trying to customers for their stall. The line 'we already ate' seems to work well to get them to stop.

If you want to eat well in Marrakech, do what the locals do and eat at the food stalls in the square. It is a common misconception that these stalls are only here for the tourists. Actually, they have been in existence long before Marrakech became a tourist destination. All of the stalls can be regarded as perfectly safe to eat at. They are strictly licensed and controlled by the government, especially now as it is a popular destination for tourists. The locals eat at the cheaper stalls that don't employ greeters and serve the more interesting food: snails, sheep head, lentils and beans...

Some tips:

Prices tend to vary a little. Depending upon how hungry you are, you can pay anything from Dh 10 for a bread filled with freshly grilled sausages or perhaps a bowl of harira soup to Dh 100 for a full three course meal with salad, bread, starter, main course, and tea.
Try harira (great soup, of lamb/beef, red lentils and vegetables) and the fried aubergines. Don't be afraid-try the lamb head: it's really tasty. The "bull stew" (beef stew) should also be given a chance in the same stalls.
Don't miss the tea! There is a row of tea sellers along the front of the food stalls who each sell tea for Dh 1.5 each (Dh 3 seemed the going rate as of 7/2011). Most of the tea at these stalls is actually ginseng tea with cinnamon and ginger... most delicious and welcoming. They also have cake, made of basically the same spices, which can be a bit overpowering.
All food stalls at Djemaa El Fna display the price on the menus, making it less likely you'll be overcharged, but many will bring starters to you without asking, then charge for them at the end.
Drinks are rarely on the menu so it is better to ask the price of them before ordering, as they can often be comparatively high. On the other hand some stalls offer free mint tea to encourage you to choose them.
Early mornings, look for people frying riifa in the covered part opposite the Koutoubia. Riifa is dough stretched and flattened and folded over, then cooked in a frying pan, and is best described as a Moroccan version of a pancake or crepe.

source: Wikivoyage

Things To Do in Marrakech See All Things To Do in Marrakech

Hotels in Marrakech (315 Hotels) See All Marrakech Hotels

  • Riad Dar Massai

    Including Spa Signature - La Sultana, Hammam de la Rose and Rue Dar el Bacha conveniently found close to the three and half star hotel, Riad Dar Massai; this hotel is app...

  • Riad Diana

    Seen in Marrakech, Riad Diana is a finest hotel conveniently placed close to Cookery Lessons at Riad Kaiss, The Spa at La Mamounia and Aabla Spa. Other crowd-pleasing poi...

  • Riyad El Cadi

    Having Rahba Kedima Square, Hammam Sweet Home and Lahandira properly placed nearby the three star hotel, Riyad El Cadi; this hotel is wonderfully positioned in the city o...

  • Zamzam Riad and Spa Marrakech

    Seen in Marrakech, Zamzam Riad and Spa Marrakech is a luxury hotel conveniently positioned close to Thrill of Morocco Tours - Day Tours, TTHP Maroc-Excursion Private Day ...

Top Destinations in Morocco