London Travel Guide

Understand

"When a man is tired of London, he is tired of life; for there is in London all that life can afford" — Samuel Johnson
History

Settlement has existed on the site of London since well before Roman times, with evidence of Bronze Age and Celtic settlement. The Roman city of Londinium, established just after the Roman conquest of Britannia in the year 43, formed the basis for the modern city (some isolated Roman period remains are still to be seen within the City). After the end of Roman rule in 410 and a short-lived decline, London experienced a gradual revival under the Anglo-Saxons, as well as the Norsemen, and emerged as a great medieval trading city, and eventually replaced Winchester as the royal capital of England. This paramount status for London was confirmed when William the Conqueror, a Norman, built the Tower of London after the conquest in 1066 and was crowned King of England in Westminster.

London went from strength to strength and with the rise of England to first European then global prominence and the city became a great centre of culture, government and industry. London's long association with the theatre, for example, can be traced back to the English renaissance (witness the Rose Theatre and great playwrights like Shakespeare who made London their home). With the rise of Britain to supreme maritime power in the 18th and 19th centuries and the possessor of the largest global empire, London became an imperial capital and drew people and influences from around the world to become, for many years, the largest city in the world.

England's royal family has, over the centuries, added much to the London scene for today's traveller: the Albert Memorial, Buckingham Palace, Kensington Palace, Royal Albert Hall, Tower of London, Kew Palace and Westminster Abbey being prominent examples.

Despite the inevitable decline of the British Empire, and considerable suffering during World War II (when London was heavily bombed by the German Luftwaffe in the Blitz), the city is still a top-ranked world city: a global centre of culture, finance, and learning. Today London is easily the largest city in the United Kingdom, eight times larger than the second largest, Birmingham, and ten times larger than the third, Glasgow, and dominates the economic, political and social life of the nation. It is full of excellent bars, galleries, museums, parks and theatres. It is also the most culturally and ethnically diverse part of the country, making it a great multicultural city to visit. Samuel Johnson famously said, "when a man is tired of London, he is tired of life". Whether you are interested in ancient history, modern art, opera or underground raves, London has it all.

The City and Westminster

If you ask a Londoner where the centre of London is, you are likely to get a wry smile. This is because historically London was two cities: a commercial city and a separate government capital.

The commercial capital was the City of London. This had a dense population and all the other pre-requisites of a medieval city: walls, a castle (The Tower of London), a cathedral (St Pauls), a semi-independent City government, a port and a bridge across which all trade was routed so Londoners could make money (London Bridge).

About an hour upstream (on foot or by boat) around a bend in the river was the government capital (Westminster). This had a church for crowning the monarch (Westminster Abbey) and palaces. As each palace was replaced by a larger one, the previous one was used for government, first the Palace of Westminster (better known as the Houses of Parliament), then Whitehall, then Buckingham Palace. The two were linked by a road called The "Strand", old English for riverbank.

London grew both west and east. The land to the west of the City (part of the parish of Westminster) was prime farming land (Covent Garden and Soho for example) and made good building land. The land to the east was flat, marshy and cheap, good for cheap housing and industry, and later for docks. Also the wind blows 3 days out of 4 from west to east, and the Thames (into which the sewage went) flows from west to east. So the West End was up-wind and up-market, the East End was where people worked for a living.

Modern-day London in these terms is a two-centre city, with the area in between known confusingly as the West End.

Climate

Despite a perhaps unfair reputation for being unsettled, London enjoys a dry and mild climate on average. Only one in three days on average will bring rain and often only for a short period. In some years, 2012 being an example, there was no rain for several weeks.

Winter in London is mild compared to nearby continental European cities due to both the presence of the Gulf Stream and the urban heat effect. Average daily maximum is 8°C (46°F) in December and January. Daylight hours are short with darkness falling by 16:00 in December.

Snow does occur, usually a few times a year but rarely heavy (a few years being exceptions such as the winters of 2009 and 2010, with temperatures dipping down to sub-zeros regularly). Snow in London can be crippling, as seen at the end of 2010. Just 7 cm (3 in) of snow will cause trains to stop running, airports to see significant delays, and the postal service to come to a halt. London is a city which does not cope well with snow; walkways, stairs, and streets will not be cleared by shovels or ploughs. The streets will be salted/gritted, but will remain slick and snow/slush covered until the sun melts it away. This is due to a lack of widespread snow-clearing infrastructure as the city does not often see snow.

Summer is perhaps the best season for tourists as it has long daylight hours as well as mild temperatures. The average daily high temperatures in July and August are around 24°C (75°F). The highest temperature since 2000 was recorded once in August at 38°C (100°F). This means London can feel hot and humid for several days in the summer months. Also, because of the urban heat effect, at night it can feel humid and muggy.

The weather in London is highly changeable regardless of the time of year. Cold temperatures and severe rain can occur even in the summer months.

Tourist information centres

Since the closure of the Britain and London Visitor Centre in December 2011 due to cost-cutting by the government, London has no centrally located tourist information centre.

The City of London Information Centre, as the last remaining information centre in any of the Central London boroughs, is now the only impartial, face-to-face source of tourist information in Central London. It is located in St. Paul's Churchyard, next to St. Paul's Cathedral, and is open every day other than Christmas Day and Boxing Day, from 09.30-17.30 Monday to Saturday, and 10.00-16.00 on Sunday.

There is no office for tourist information for the whole of the UK nor for the whole of England.

source: Wikivoyage

Things To Do in London See All Things To Do in London

  • Bomber Command Memorial

    Bomber Command Memorial

    Hyde Park Corner

    Attractions,Landmarks and Points Of Interest
  • Union Chapel, Islington

    Union Chapel, Islington

    Compton Terrace

    Union Chapel is a working church, live entertainment venue and charity drop-in centre for the homele...

    Attractions, Activities, Lifestyle,Arts and Culture, Entertainment, Nightlife
  • Borough Market

    Borough Market

    8 Southwark Street

    Borough Market is a wholesale and retail food market in Southwark, Central London, England. It is on...

    Lifestyle, Attractions, Local Stores and Services,Shopping, Historical Sites, Food and Drink, Landmarks and Points Of Interest, Stores
  • Wallace Collection

    Wallace Collection

    Hertford House, Manchester Squ...

    The Wallace Collection is a museum in London, with a world-famous range of fine and decorative arts ...

    Attractions,Arts and Culture, Historical Sites

Hotels in London (1247 Hotels) See All London Hotels

  • Hour Glass Hotel

    Having Buckingham & Wilmslow Film Society Theatre, The Y Theatre and Emirates Air Line - Royal Docks ideally found nearby the two star hotel, Hour Glass Hotel; this hotel...

  • MEININGER Hotel London Hyde Park - Hostel

    MEININGER Hotel London Hyde Park - Hostel is one of the top, premium places to stay in London. Nicely placed nearby Baden-Powell House, Crafts Council Gallery Shop/Victor...

  • MacDonald

    Including King's Cross Station, Trailhop Adventures - Bike Tours and Water Rats properly found close to the two star hotel, MacDonald; this hotel is perfectly positioned ...

  • Meridiana

    Including King's Cross Station, Trailhop Adventures - Bike Tours and Water Rats readily found near the two and half star hotel, Meridiana; this hotel is appropriately pos...

Top Destinations in United Kingdom