Bratislava Travel Guide

Understand

Bratislava has a very pleasant medieval inner city with narrow, winding streets, a hill-top castle next to the river Danube, and many historic churches and buildings to visit. The old town is centered on two squares, Hlavne namestie (main square) and Hviezdoslavovo namestie (Hviezdoslav square, named after a famous Slovak poet). Of a rather different architectural character are some of the communist-era buildings found in the modern parts of the city; a prime example is Petrzalka housing estate, the biggest Communist-era concrete block housing complex in Central Europe, which stretches on endlessly just across the river. Move further east and there are plenty of rural places to explore. Farms, vineyards, agricultural land, and tiny villages are situated less than 50 kilometres to the north and east of Bratislava.

Today, Bratislava and its surroundings form the second-most prosperous region in Central and Eastern Europe, with a per capita GDP of around 167% of the EU-27 average (after Prague).

History

After the fall of the Great Moravian Empire, Slovakia became part of the Kingdom of Hungary from the 10th century until the end of the First World War. The city was even the capital (1536-1784), the coronation city (1563-1830), and the seat of the diet (1536-1848) of the Kingdom of Hungary for three centuries. In this period, eleven Hungarian kings and queens were crowned at St. Martin's Cathedral. At that time, the city was called Preßburg in German and Pozsony in Hungarian, and had a clear German (42%) and Hungarian (40%) ethnic majority (1910 census). In 1919, the Treaty of Trianon created Czechoslovakia, and Bratislava was attached to the newly founded state. In the same year, the name Bratislava was officially adopted for the first time in history.

Between 1939 and 1944, Slovakia was a Nazi Germany-controlled state. In 1941–1942 and 1944–1945, the pro-Nazi Slovak government cooperated in deporting most of Bratislava's approximately 15,000 Jews. Bratislava was occupied by German troops in 1944, and eventually taken by the Soviet Red Army on 4 April 1945, after a failed insurrection of Slovak partisans, now commemorated as Slovenského národného povstania, or "Slovak National Uprising".

After the Communist Party seized power in Czechoslovakia in February 1948, the city witnessed profound demographic and urban transformation, and in 1969 it became the capital city of the Slovak Socialist Republic, one of the two component state of federal Czechoslovakia.

Bratislava's dissidents anticipated the fall of Communism with the Bratislava candle demonstration in 1988, and the city became one of the foremost centres of the anti-Communist "Velvet Revolution" in 1989. In 1993, the city became the capital of the newly formed Slovak Republic following the "Velvet Divorce".

source: Wikivoyage

Things To Do in Bratislava See All Things To Do in Bratislava

Hotels in Bratislava (81 Hotels) See All Bratislava Hotels

  • Sheraton Hotel Bratislava

    Sheraton Hotel Bratislava is among the best, finest places to lodge in Bratislava. Beautifully situated around Slovak National Theatre, The new building of the Slovak Nat...

  • Mamaison Residence Sulekova Bratislava

    Mamaison Residence Sulekova Bratislava is among the ideal, premium places to lodge in Bratislava. Nicely located around Goat's Gate Cemetery, Enjoy Bratislava and Slavin,...

  • ARCADIA Hotel

    Located in Bratislava, ARCADIA Hotel is a luxury hotel conveniently found nearby City Gallery of Bratislava, Franciscan Church and Monastery and Hurban Square (Hurbanovo ...

  • Hotel Danubia Gate

    Hotel Danubia Gate is among the best, finest places to remain in Bratislava. Nicely placed in close proximity to Cediro - Private Tours, St Elizabeth's / Blue Church and ...

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